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Meet Hassan, Sorie and Kate.

Street Child was started in 2008 with a single project for 100 street children in Makeni, Northern Sierra Leone.

Since then, we have helped 200,000 vulnerable children into education.

Street Child provides simple and sustainable solutions such as paying school fees, buying uniforms and learning materials, training teachers, refurbishing classrooms and building schools to ensure that children have access to education.

Meet Hassan, Sorie and Kate who have all benefitted from our support:

 
Hassan, 12 years old , is a beneficiary of Street Child's 'Girls Speak Out' UK Aid Match appeal in 2016.

Hassan, 12 years old, is a beneficiary of Street Child's 'Girls Speak Out' UK Aid Match appeal in 2016.

 
 

“Last year, my mother and father's business fell through so we ran out of money. I live with my five siblings and they could no longer look after us. Street Child helped my parents restart their milk selling business. Now we are all in school and we don't need to worry anymore. I have lots of best friends at school and I look forward to it everyday. One day, I want to be a lawyer.”

Sorie, aged 17 , lives at a residential rehabilitation centre in the Kambia district of Sierra Leone which is run by our partner organization WESOFOD.

Sorie, aged 17, lives at a residential rehabilitation centre in the Kambia district of Sierra Leone which is run by our partner organization WESOFOD.

“My greatest challenges in my daily life are the structural barriers in school and public places. I was embarrassed when I had to ask friends to carry me in and out of public places.”

“I am happy I have an opportunity to go to school. I make lots of friends through the monthly social events. I am well cared for. I have the opportunity to attend community meetings and even contribute to those meetings. I am respected in school.” 

 

Kate, 17 years old,  lives with a care giver at the same residential rehabilitation centre as Sorie.

Kate, 17 years old, lives with a care giver at the same residential rehabilitation centre as Sorie.

“WESOFOD support has greatly empowered me. I can now stand in the midst of colleagues and talk. I am bold. I have much knowledge about my disability and how to live normally in society. I am now able to talk for others.”

“When I took the National Primary School Exams, I came 2nd across the district. This was my happiest moment. My name was announced on the radio. Lots of friends came to visit and celebrate with me.” 

“My hope is that one day I will become an international doctor. I hope I will have an opportunity in future to pay back by helping other children with disabilities in my community and around the world.”