A Year in Review

 

2016 was a big year for Street Child - and it’s all thanks to you. Here are a just a few of the highlights that you made possible. Thanks for standing with us to help thousands of the world’s poorest children go to school. 


Family Business Grants - Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone

This year, over 6,000 Ebola-affected families in Sierra Leone received family business grants, helping them rebuild their lives long-term and ensuring 10,000 children could go to school.  A further 2,080 Ebola-impacted households received emergency food packages in partnership with the World Food Programme. Street Child are now constructing 29 secondary school classroom blocks, with sites in Bombali, Kenema, Kailahun and Port Loko.

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Nepal

By January 2016, we had already completed 40 emergency education structures in Okhaldhunga, one of the areas most affected by the 2015 Nepal Earthquake. We’re currently building 180 semi-permanent schools across Nepal to improve access to education for earthquake impacted children and have trained 400 teachers and communities in earthquake response.

Liberia

In September, in partnership with the Liberian government, we took over 12 schools in rural areas, and have trained and supported a further 45 teachers. After Liberia was declared Ebola-free in January 2016, we have continued to work with impacted families. 90 Ebola-affected families received grants, which helped 250 children back into school. 


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The Ground-Breaking Girls Speak Out Appeal

"The worst of the Ebola crisis may be behind us, but countries like Sierra Leone and Liberia continue to feel its impact. The epidemic closed schools and forced children out of education. Many are yet to return."

- Justine Greening (International Development Secretary 2012-2016)

In April we launched our successful Girls Speak Out Appeal to help more girls in post-Ebola West Africa to have a chance to complete their education. 

Our groundbreaking research with over 2,000 adolescent girls in Sierra Leone found that girls are much more likely than boys to drop out of school at critical education stages. This means that many girls leave school before they are literate which seriously damages the opportunities open to these girls as they grow older. UNICEF research states that a single year of secondary education has the potential to increase a girl’s future earnings by up to 25%. In response, Girls Speak Out aimed to ensure that girls in Sierra Leone could go to school and stay there

Thanks to your amazing support we hit our appeal target of £1,000,000 which was matched by the UK government, meaning that we can help 20,000 children to go to school and complete their education. This is an incredible result and we are so grateful to everyone who got behind this campaign!

As a charity that is heavily invested in the future of Sierra Leone, we wanted to find out why girls were leaving school with such frequency. So, we decided to ask them - to give them the opportunity to speak out. You can read our groundbreaking report on the issues affecting girls, and girls' education here

Thanks to Girls Speak Out I...

Mary lives in Westpoint, Liberia, and had been out of school for one year. Thanks to Street Child, she received a new book-bag, exercise books, shoes and uniform to help her return to education.

Mary lives in Westpoint, Liberia, and had been out of school for one year. Thanks to Street Child, she received a new book-bag, exercise books, shoes and uniform to help her return to education.

...returned to school, with new equipment.

Adama lost both her parents to Ebola, and was forced to look after her 4 younger sisters. She received business support from Street Child, and cover for 6 months of rent to give her, and her family, a place of their own. 

Adama lost both her parents to Ebola, and was forced to look after her 4 younger sisters. She received business support from Street Child, and cover for 6 months of rent to give her, and her family, a place of their own. 

...started a business, and found a home of our own.

This is Love and her grandmother Theresa. Love's mother Arthurline could no longer afford to go to school and instead spent the money on Love. Thanks to Street Child, Arthurline has the opportunity to return to school. 

This is Love and her grandmother Theresa. Love's mother Arthurline could no longer afford to go to school and instead spent the money on Love. Thanks to Street Child, Arthurline has the opportunity to return to school. 

...was able to support myself, and my child.


National Recognition for our work and supporters!

Secretary of International Development, Rt. Hon Priti Patel visited our school in Port Loko, Sierra Leone (pictured above), to see how UK Aid funding will keep children in secondary education. This year, our projects in West Africa were also visited by Jeremy Lefroy MP and Wendy Morton MP. Read Wendy's reflections on her time in Sierra Leone here. Rachel Reeves MP also reflected on life one year on from Ebola, you can read it here.

David Hellard received a Points of Light Award in April from No. 10 Downing Street. The Points of Light Award is given by the British Government to outstanding individual volunteers, and David was recognised for his incredible dedication to Street Child. This year David ran the 152 mile Marathon Des Sables for us, finishing as first British competitor. The award recognised David's participation in extraordinary challenges on behalf of Street Child for over 4 years.  


The Kate Gross School opened in Kpondu

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Our Incredible Supporters took on Epic Challenges

The energy and commitment of fundraisers at our challenge events is unparalleled, and this year was no exception. Not only did 120 runners brave the 6th Sierra Leone Marathon, we also took 30 runners to Nepal for the inaugural International Marathon. And in 2017, we're looking forward to going further than we ever have before - 300 km between Bo, Sierra Leone and Robertsport, Liberia - in the West Africa Cycle Challenge. Information about all our challenge events, including how you can take part in 2017, can be found here.


Ebola, One Year On...

"Whilst there has been some welcome recovery for many Ebola impacted families and thousands of orphans have been helped by Street Child and others, some of the most at-risk orphans are still in acute conditions. We should celebrate that the Ebola epidemic is over but we must recognise that for the most complex and vulnerable cases, the crisis certainly isn’t."

- Tom Dannatt (Street Child CEO)

In November, we marked the first anniversary of Sierra Leone being declared Ebola Free. All Street Child staff observed a 3 minute silence to those who lost their lives during the 2014-2015 outbreak. 

Since we launched our preliminary Ebola response, we have given direct financial assistance to over 20,000 children in Sierra Leone and Liberia. However, there is still work to be done. Recently, we identified 1,400 Orphans still seriously at-risk after Ebola. With your support, we hope to provide long-term and sustainable support for every one of these children. 

Read about the long lasting impact of Ebola, and Street Child's Response below:


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Thank you from Ibrahim in Sierra Leone


2017: A New Challenge...

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In North East Nigeria thousands of children are facing starvation and three million children are out of school. Conflict has seen schools destroyed, teachers killed, families torn apart and entire communities displaced. UNICEF recently called this ‘the world’s worst humanitarian crisis’ but it’s a forgotten emergency and the international community has been slow to act. Street Child has launched an emergency appeal to help vulnerable children in urgent and desperate need. We need to raise £100,000 to make this possible.  In 2017, we will work towards providing safe education spaces and emergency support for a children at risk becoming a lost generation. Together, we can ensure that children in Nigeria have the chance to rebuild their lives and return to school. We hope you will join us in standing with these forgotten children.

Thank You from Street Child